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Top Ten Cartoons of the Week – July 4, 2020

Here are the ten most widely published cartoons of the week (June 27 through July 4, 2020). As usual, no drawings of President Trump are among the most reprinted cartoons.  We had no Most Popular list last week, and no list for the month of June, because we had a technical glitch, losing client download data for three days. Sorry about that. But the stats are working this week!

Editors always love cartoons about holidays and anniversaries – that is clear to see this week as five Fourth of July cartoons made the list. This week was unusual because the steep curve we usually see between the few cartoons editors like and all the other cartoons was flattened, so the most popular cartoons were less popular than usual, and the less popular cartoons were more popular than usual. Cartoons number 11 through 30 aren’t so far behind numbers 1 through 10. Perhaps because the curve flattened and the Top Ten is more tightly bunched this week, we have more ties. So … good job everyone! Everybody getting more reprints is what I like to see!

Our Top Ten is a measure of how many editors choose to reprint each of our cartoons, from the 62 cartoonists in our syndication package. Just about half of America’s daily, paid circulation newspapers (around 700 papers) subscribe to CagleCartoons.com.

Congratulations to Dave Granlund for drawing the most reprinted cartoon this week! Kudos to Jeff Koterba for placing an impressive THREE cartoons in the Top Ten and to Milt Priggee with TWO of the most reprinted cartoons on the list! And congratulations to the rest of the cartoonists who drew the most reprinted cartoons this week: Steve Sack, John Darkow, Bruce Plante and Nate Beeler.  Great work, gentlemen!


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#1

Congratulations to Dave Granlund who drew the #1 most reprinted cartoon this week.

 

#2

Jeff Koterba was a very close second with this cartoon.

 

#3

Bruce Plante takes third place.

 

#4

Steve Sack is in 4th place.

#5

We have a three way tie for 5th place, here’s  Milt Priggee.

#5

Jeff Koterba also takes the 5th place spot.

 

#5

Milt Priggee has a second cartoon that is tied for 5th place.

 

#8

John Darkow is tied for 8th place.

 

#8

Jeff Koterba is also tied for 8th place with his impressive THIRD cartoon in the Top Ten this week.

#10

Nate Beeler rounds out the list in 10th.


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Don’t miss our most popular cartoons of the week collections:

Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through November 21st, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through November 14th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through November 7th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through October 31st, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through October 24th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through October 17th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through October 10th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through October 3rd, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through September 26th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through September 19th, 2020
T
op Ten Cartoons of the Week through September 12th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through September 5th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through August 29th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through August 22nd, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through August 15th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through August 8th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through August 1st, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through July 25th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through July 18th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through July 11th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through July 4th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through June 20th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through June 13th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through June 6th, 2020

Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through May 30th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through May 23rd, 2020

Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through May 16th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through May 8th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Pandemic (as of May 4th)
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through May 2nd, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through 4/26/20, (all coronavirus)

Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through 4/18/20, (all coronavirus)
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week, through 4/11/20 (all coronavirus)
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week, 4/4/20 (all coronavirus)
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week, 3/29/20 (all coronavirus)
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week, 3/21/20 (all coronavirus)

Categories
Blog Columns

The NRA and Comic-Con

This weekend I went to the National Rifle Association (NRA) convention in Nashville, Tennessee, my hometown. I’m an editorial cartoonist; I sit at home drawing and I rarely go to big conventions. The only thing I have to compare the NRA to is the San Diego Comic-Con, and I thought the NRA convention stacked up pretty well to Comic-Con.

The NRA convention is half the size of Comic-Con. The crowd was certainly different, with the NRA sporting more beer bellies and gray hair than Comic-Con. Both the NRA and Comic-Con are mostly male, and both are full of fervent fans. It is a lot easier to park and get a hotel room at the NRA convention, and it is much cheaper and easier to get into the NRA than Comic-Con, which costs well more than ten times the $25 it costs to join the NRA and attend the NRA convention. Comic-Con sells out months in advance; anyone can go to the NRA at the last minute – like me.

There isn’t much religion at Comic-Con, although it isn’t unusual to hear people exclaim, “Oh my God” when they see the length of the line to meet the cast members of “The Big Bang Theory.”

NRA-PrayforWeb
Everyone in a crowd of thousands at the NRA Annual Meeting held hands, bowed their heads and followed along in a prayer about how God has chosen the NRA to defend us against the “enemies of freedom.” I was actually near the front of the room, where I took this photo. That’s the NRA’s executive officers on the stage in the distance, holding hands. Click on the photo to enlarge.

There’s lots of religion at NRA conventions. The Saturday morning NRA annual meeting began with everyone in the audience holding hands and bowing their heads as someone on the stage prayed about how God has chosen the NRA to lead the fight against the “enemies of freedom” who, we were later told, are President Obama, Hillary Clinton and Michael Bloomberg, in that order.

There are enemies at Comic-Con too; scattered through the crowd are assorted Darth Vaders, storm-troopers, super-villains and monsters. Years ago there were Klingons everywhere, but the Klingons have dwindled in recent years, and now they are rare. My effort to build up my Klingon vocabulary has clearly been a waste of time. “Ghay’cha’!”

There was an anti-gun protest group, in town for the NRA convention, that had trouble making a dinner reservation. I’m told they were unwelcome at nearby restaurants, and their group had to drive thirty minutes out of Nashville, to Murfreesboro, for dinner. It is also difficult to make a dinner reservation at Comic-Con.

The exhibit floors at the NRA and Comic-Con are fascinating. One NRA exhibit I enjoyed featured videos of cool stuff getting shot, including row after row of watermelons, which made impressive explosions. Rows of televisions being shot were much less interesting than the watermelons. The legislature in Tennessee is debating allowing exploding targets. Tennessee already allows for the sale of fantastic fireworks – the aerial kind that would start forest fires if they were allowed in flammable California – but in Tennessee, fireworks are wholesome fun. Explosions are popular at Comic-Con too (the Death Star comes to mind). Alas, real, legal explosions in California are just the stuff of dreams.

Tennessee’s Republican legislature has been pandering to the NRA in the weeks leading up to the convention; they are close to passing a “Guns in Parks” bill that would prohibit cities from banning guns in their municipal parks. Most of the prospective Republican presidential candidates gave speeches at the NRA convention on the first day. At the annual meeting, many mentions of vile Democrats were met with hisses from the enthusiastic, Republican crowd, who were equally angry about Islamic extremists, defending the border with Mexico, and President Obama as they were about threats of gun control. The NRA convention is about much more than guns; it is about a broad agenda that is Republican, conservative, and Christian.

The same mission-creep is apparent at Comic-Con, which should be about comic books, but has grown to be about anything entertainment related, which may have nothing to do with comics. Any TV show. Any movie. Whatever. Are there some TV stars from a detective, procedural show doing a panel? Yes? Let’s go stand in line! My God, the line is so long.

As the Klingons would say, “petaQ!”

nra-and-comic-con