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Blog Newsletter Syndicate

Dragging the GOP and My Photoshop Recipe

Here’s my new cartoon, with President Biden dragging the GOP doggie to places where it doesn’t want to go.

I get lots of questions from cartoonists about how I recommend that they prepare their cartoons for syndication. Here is the “recipe” we give to our CagleCartoonists. Some new CagleCartoonists are old timers without computer skills, so the recipe is very detailed about little details that are self evident to the tech savvy.

First, I do a line drawing on paper in pencil or ink and I scan it. It isn’t important that it is on paper; drawing it electronically is fine, the important thing is that it is line art. This recipe is for coloring traditional cartoons with black lines.  The point of this is so that the lines remain clean and crispy black, and don’t spread with the poor registration we often see in newspaper printing.

So, scan the art at highest resolution in Grayscale – the higher the better, usually scanners do 600dpi.  Open the art in Photoshop, straighten the angle if necessary (IMAGE > Image Rotation), draw a marquee rectangle precisely around the art, just where you want it cropped, and EDIT > Copy (Command C), open a new document, which will open at the size of the copied art, and EDIT > Paste (Command V).

Go to IMAGE > Image Size, deselect “Constrain Proportions”, select 1000 pixels/inch, Width 8 inches, Height 6 inches – or vary the height a bit if the art is a different proportion, 4”x3” is good. Click OK

Why 4 x 3? Because newspaper leave a wide rectangle as the hole for editorial cartoons, and if cartoons are square or tall, almost no newspapers will print them. This is frustrating for gag cartoonists, and others who like a taller format that works better on the Web. Cartoonists who fight the wide rectangle just don’t get reprinted in newspapers.

Go to IMAGE > Brightness/Contrast, turn the contrast to 100% and adjust the brightness to what looks nice. Repeat if necessary. Make it a little darker than you think is necessary because it will lighten up in the next step. Click OK

GO to IMAGE > Mode > Bitmap, with method “50% Threshold” – if it is too light, UNDO the transformation to Bitmap and repeat the last step on the Grayscale image, making the image a bit darker/denser with the Brightness, then select “Bitmap” again.You’ll get something like this:

Clean up any hickies and make any changes in Photoshop with the brush and lasso tools.

Save as a TIFF format file with LZW compression. The file should be around 2 megs in size.

Then go on to color …

Take the bitmap/line art image we just made, go to the IMAGE menu and change to: GRAYSCALE, then go to the IMAGE menu again and change to CMYK.

Open the Layers Window from the WINDOWS menu. Add about 20 transparent background layers (Command Shift N, twenty times), drag the line art image to the top layer

Select the top layer and select the black line color with the eyedropper tool. Then go to the SELECT menu and select COLOR RANGE, selecting only the black lines, then select the “black” foreground color in the tools menu and make the black: 0%C, 0%M, 0%Y, 100%K, then select the EDIT menu and choose FILL.

With the top layer still selected, go to the SELECT menu and choose INVERSE, selecting the white areas, and delete – it should show a checkerboard pattern meaning the background is transparent and nothing is there. Select MULTIPLY from the drop menu at the top of the Layers window, this makes the color in the layers underneath the black lines print under the black lines so there is no haloing in printing. What this does is print the color under the back lines, so there is no “haloing” with bad registration.

Select the bottom layer from the LAYERS window, Select ALL (Command A), Go to the Tools window and select the foreground color and make it 0%C, 0%M, 0%Y, 0%K (white) and select FILL from the EDIT menu.

Then add colors on the layers in between to your taste. Label layers as you go to make them easy to find and group similar colors together. Save a copy at 1000dpi for your personal files as a CMYK TIFF with LZW compression as a copy with no layers. Go to the IMAGE menu and select IMAGE SIZE and resize the image to 500dpi. Save as the file to upload to CagleCartoons.com as a TIFF file with LZW compression and no layers – the file should be about 6megs in size.  You’ll end up with something like this.

Why CMYK? Most clients prefer RGB, which is best for the Web; they get photos in RGB format, and RGB files are smaller. But this recipe lets us have clean, crispy 100% black lines and if a printer can use a CMYK file, then CMYK is superior. In our system, editors have a choice of downloading the files as RGB, but they can only download CMYK if the file is originally created in CMYK.

In our system we have a 6.5 meg file size limit – that is because we often email cartoons and we don’t want the emails to be too big. We ask artists to make the images no smaller than 4,000 pixels wide. As a last step, reduce the resolution of the image so that it comes in under 6.5megs, and is 4,000 pixels wide. You should be able to come up with a TIFF file with LZW compression that is about 6 megs in size. Remember flatten the image so it isn’t huge with layers – but first, while you have layers …

Make a grayscale version …

We ask artists to make a grayscale version. Most newspapers still print in black and white, and it is nice to be able to control the contrast. When editors go to our site and select a cartoon they want in color, it brings up a preview page where they have a choice of a grayscale version. If the artist doesn’t prepare the grayscale version, our system creates it from the color cartoon, and that isn’t as nice. We also deliver grayscale cartoons by email to newspaper who want that. Better to control this and tweak a grayscale version.

Save Image with a new name. Select from the IMAGE menu: MODE: Grayscale. Adjust the Brightness and Contrast of the layers to taste.

Select FLATTEN IMAGE from the Layers window and save as a TIFF with LZW Compression – or save as a TIFF LZW compression copy with no layers and skip this step.

Why TIFF format? Because it is “non-lossy” and images should be saved in the best quality. Most artists prefer to save files in JPG format, and most newspapers prefer JPG formal also, since they get photos in that format. When editors download cartoons in our system they have a choice of JPG or TIFF. Saving an image as a 12 quality JPG isn’t “lossy,” but it may be bigger than a TIFF.

The grayscale file should be about 3 megs in size, and looks something like this …

I know I overexplained this, but the questions I get from artists are pretty granular.  I’m afraid I can’t really overexplain it.  I’ll bookmark this page and give it to cartoonists everytime this comes up.

The cartoonists push back against being asked for higher resolution that they want to do. They push back against TIFF format, and CMYK. They push back against the wide rectangle format. Especially the international cartoonists. It never ends.

This comes up all the time.


Our reader supported site, Cagle.com, still needs you!  Journalism is threatened with the pandemic that has shuttered newspaper advertisers. Some pundits predict that a large percentage of newspapers won’t survive the pandemic economic slump, and as newspapers sink, editorial cartoonists who depend on newspapers sink too, and along with them, our Cagle.com site.

The world needs political cartoonists more now than ever. Please consider supporting Cagle.com and visit Cagle.com/heroes.

 

 

Categories
Blog Newsletter Syndicate Top 10

Top Ten Cartoons of the Week – January 2, 2021

Here are our most reprinted cartoons of last week (December 26th through January 2nd 2021).

Eight of the cartoons are on a New Years theme. As usual, there are no cartoons about Trump or Biden. Editors were most interested in cartoons about how terrible 2020 was.

The Top Ten cartoons are what most readers see since only 20% of the cartoons get 80% of the reprints.

The top cartoons on the list performed especially well, and the top three each would have been a number one cartoon in a normal week. Congratulations to #1 Dave Whamond, #2 Dave Granlund and #3 Bruce Plante!

And kudos to the other cartoonists on the Top Ten this week: Jeff Koterba, Rick McKee, Pat Byrnes, John Darkow, Gary McCoy, Randall Enos and Peter Kuper!

Our Top Ten is a measure of how many editors choose to reprint each of our cartoons, from the 62 cartoonists in our CagleCartoons.com syndication package. Just about half of America’s daily, paid circulation newspapers (around 700 papers) subscribe to CagleCartoons.com


Our reader supported site, Cagle.com, still needs you!  Journalism is threatened with the pandemic that has shuttered newspaper advertisers. Some pundits predict that a large percentage of newspapers won’t survive the pandemic economic slump, and as newspapers sink, editorial cartoonists who depend on newspapers sink too, and along with them, our Cagle.com site.

The world needs political cartoonists more now than ever. Please consider supporting Cagle.com and visit Cagle.com/heroes.

 

#1

Dave Whamond wins the week with a terrible 2020 New Years cartoon.

 

#2

Dave Granlund wins second place with a another terrible 2020 New Years cartoon.

 

#3

Bruce Plante takes third place with a COVID New Years cartoon.

 

#4

Jeff Koterba takes 4th place with another terrible 2020 New Years cartoon.

 

#5

Rick McKee claims 5th place.

 

#6

Pat Byrnes nabs 6th place with another terrible 2020 cartoon.

 

#7

John Darkow snags 7th place.

 

#8

Gary McCoy claims 8th place.

 

#9

Randall Enos takes 9th place.

 

#10

Peter Kuper rounds out the list with the only cartoon referencing the politics of the week.


Want to get EVERY new CagleCartoon from our 62 syndicated newspaper editorial cartoonists, in your email box every day? Just become a Cagle.com HERO and you get the exclusive daily emails of ALL THE CARTOONS!  See all the cartoons before the newspapers print them and never miss a cartoon!


Categories
Blog Newsletter Syndicate Top 10

Peter Kuper 2020 Top Ten

Here are Peter Kuper’s  Top Ten cartoons of the year that were most reprinted in newspapers. Peter Kuper is a regular contributor to The New Yorker, The Nation and MAD Magazine where he has written and illustrated SPY vs. SPY every issue since 1997. He is the co-founder and editor of World War 3 Illustrated a political graphics magazine that has given a forum to political artists for 40 years. He has produced over two dozen books including The System, Diario de Oaxaca, Ruins (winner of the 2016 Eisner Award) and adaptations of many of Franz Kafka’s works into comics including The Metamorphosis and Kafkaesque (winner of the 2018 Reuben Award) . His latest graphic novel is an adaptation of Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness. He has lectured around the world and has taught comics courses at The School of Visual Arts in NYC and Harvard University

We keep statistics on how many editors, who subscribe to our syndicate service at CagleCartoons.com, download each cartoon. Over the next few days I’ll post Top Ten cartoons from some of our other CagleCartoonists!  See Peter’s cartoon archive on Cagle.com


Our reader supported site, Cagle.com, still needs you!  Journalism is threatened with the pandemic that has shuttered newspaper advertisers. Some pundits predict that a large percentage of newspapers won’t survive the pandemic economic slump, and as newspapers sink, editorial cartoonists who depend on newspapers sink too, and along with them, our Cagle.com site.

The world needs political cartoonists more now than ever. Please consider supporting Cagle.com and visit Cagle.com/heroes.

#1

 

#2

 

#3

 

#4

 

#5

 

#6

 

#7

 

#8

 

#9

 

#10


Want to get EVERY new CagleCartoon from our 62 syndicated newspaper editorial cartoonists, in your email box every day? Just become a Cagle.com HERO and you get the exclusive daily emails of ALL THE CARTOONS!  See all the cartoons before the newspapers print them and never miss a cartoon!


Categories
Blog Newsletter Syndicate Top 10

Top Ten Cartoons of the Week – December 12, 2020

Here are our most reprinted cartoons of last week (December 5th through December 12th 2020).

Six of the cartoons combined Christmas with Covid themes, which is clearly what newspaper editors want to see right now. As usual, no drawings of Trump or Biden made the Top Ten, even as transition problems and Trump’s last lawsuit dominated cable news. No cartoons about foreign issues were popular, despite some excellent cartoons about Boris Johnson, the EU and failing Brexit trade negotiations.

The Top Ten cartoons are what readers see since only 20% of the cartoons get 80% of the reprints.

Rick McKee won the week with a strong #1 cartoon,  Jeff Koterba and John Darkow each had two cartoons in the Top Ten. Great work, gentlemen.

Congratulations to the other cartoonists with the most reprinted cartoons of the week, RJ MatsonPat ByrnesNate Beeler, Dave Granlund and John Cole.

Our Top Ten is a measure of how many editors choose to reprint each of our cartoons, from the 62 cartoonists in our CagleCartoons.com syndication package. Just about half of America’s daily, paid circulation newspapers (around 700 papers) subscribe to CagleCartoons.com


Our reader supported site, Cagle.com, still needs you!  Journalism is threatened with the pandemic that has shuttered newspaper advertisers. Some pundits predict that a large percentage of newspapers won’t survive the pandemic economic slump, and as newspapers sink, editorial cartoonists who depend on newspapers sink too, and along with them, our Cagle.com site.

The world needs political cartoonists more now than ever. Please consider supporting Cagle.com and visit Cagle.com/heroes.

 

#1

Rick McKee wins the week with this very popular Christmas/pandemic cartoon.

 

#2

RJ Matson takes second place with this impressive cartoon that he tells me he created in Photoshop in only two hours. Unbelievable.

 

#3

Jeff Koterba snags third place with this Christmas/COVID combo cartoon.

 

#4

Jeff Koterba takes 4th place with another Christmas/COVID combo cartoon.

 

#5

Nate Beeler takes 5th place with this Christmas/COVID combo cartoon.

 

#6

Pat Byrnes claims 6th place with this COVID cartoon.

 

#7

John Darkow claims 7th place with a cartoon implying that 2020 was a bad year and 2021 will be better – one of the most popular themes for editors.

 

#8

John Darkow wins 8th place with this Chuck Yeager memorial cartoon. There was a time when obit cartoons were the most popular with editors, but those days have been drowned out by the pandemic.

 

#9

Dave Granlund nabs 8th place with the only cartoon about the ugly presidential transition that dominates the news, but not the ink. The candy coating of a 2020 year cartoon makes it a cartoon that editors will swallow.

 

#10

John Cole takes 10th place with a cartoon about virtual learning during the pandemic. Education during the pandemic is another favorite theme for editors.


Want to get EVERY new CagleCartoon from our 62 syndicated newspaper editorial cartoonists, in your email box every day? Just become a Cagle.com HERO and you get the exclusive daily emails of ALL THE CARTOONS!  See all the cartoons before the newspapers print them and never miss a cartoon!


Categories
Blog Newsletter Syndicate Top 10

Top Ten Cartoons of the Week – December 5, 2020

Here are our most reprinted cartoons of last week (November 28th through December 5th 2020). The Top Ten cartoons were tightly bunched, and all were big hits with editors.

Five of the cartoons had Christmas themes. Seven of the cartoons are about the pandemic. As usual, no drawings of Trump were popular with newspaper editors. No cartoons about foreign issues were popular. 20% of the cartoons get 80% of the reprints – that means the Top Ten cartoons are what readers see.

Dave Whamond had a great week again this week, with strong #1 and #4 cartoons. RJ Matson had a very impressive week, with the #2 and #6 cartoons. Dave Granlund is also second to no one with two cartoons in the Top Ten.

Congratulations to the other cartoonists with the most reprinted cartoons of the week, John Darkow, Rick McKee, Adam Zyglis and Jeff Koterba who continues his long streak in the Top Ten.

Our Top Ten is a measure of how many editors choose to reprint each of our cartoons, from the 62 cartoonists in our CagleCartoons.com syndication package. Just about half of America’s daily, paid circulation newspapers (around 700 papers) subscribe to CagleCartoons.com


Our reader supported site, Cagle.com, still needs you!  Journalism is threatened with the pandemic that has shuttered newspaper advertisers. Some pundits predict that a large percentage of newspapers won’t survive the pandemic economic slump, and as newspapers sink, so do editorial cartoonists who depend on newspapers, and along with them, our Cagle.com site, that our small, sinking syndicate largely supports, along with our fans.

The world needs political cartoonists more now than ever. Please consider supporting Cagle.com and visit Cagle.com/heroes.  We need you! Don’t let the cartoons die!

#1

Dave Whamond wins the week with this very popular Christmas/pandemic cartoon.

 

#2

RJ Matson takes second place with his first of two cartoons in the Top Ten.

 

#3

John Darkow snags third place with this about the female football player at Vanderbilt – a topic that editors clearly wanted to see in cartoons.

 

#4

Dave Granlund is tied for 4th place again with the first of his three cartoons in the Top Ten.

 

#4

Dave Whamond is also tied for 4th place with his second cartoon on the most reprinted list. Editors love cartoons that complain about how terrible this year has been.

 

#6

RJ Matson  takes 6th place with this beautiful rendering. Waterfalls are hard to draw, the Capitol building is hard to draw, and it is hard to make this dramatic perspective work.  This one is an eye-popper.

 

#7

Jeff Koterba claims 7th place with another Christmas/pandemic cartoon. Jeff seems to have carved out a permanent home on the weekly Top Ten.

 

#8

Dave Granlund is tied for 8th place with his second cartoon in the Top Ten.

 

#8

Rick McKee shares the tie for 8th place. Editors don’t seem to shy away from Biden cartoons, as they do with Trump cartoons, but cartoonists don’t draw Biden often.

 

#10

Adam Zyglis avoids drawing a self-portrait in this auto-biographical cartoon.


Want to get EVERY new CagleCartoon from our 62 syndicated newspaper editorial cartoonists, in your email box every day? Just become a Cagle.com HERO and you get the exclusive daily emails of ALL THE CARTOONS!  See all the cartoons before the newspapers print them and never miss a cartoon!


Categories
Blog Newsletter Syndicate Top 10

Top Ten Cartoons of the Week – November 7, 2020

This was a crazy election week! Here are our most reprinted cartoons of last week (October 31st through November 7th 2020). Newspaper editors found lots of cartoons they liked this week and the usage curve was flattened. Many cartoons were bunched together in the stats, with each getting lots of reprints – very different from recent weeks when editors all reprinted the same, few cartoons. Editors found a lot to like this week.

We have a crazy, improbable, four way tie for first place, with each first place cartoon getting about half as many reprints as last week’s #1 cartoon. Every Top Ten cartoon this week was about the election but, as usual, none of the most reprinted cartoons included drawings of Trump or Biden.  This is the first week for many months where no coronavirus cartoons made the Top Ten.

Congrats to Jeff Koterba who has two cartoons on the list, including one cartoon tied for #1. Two of my own cartoons tied for #1. Kudos to Rick McKee who also shares the four-way tie for #1 this week.

I was pleased to see our new CagleCartoonist, Pat Byrnes, made the Top Ten list this week. Congratulations to the other cartoonists with the most reprinted cartoons this week: RJ Matson, Dave Granlund, John Darkow and Pat Bagley.

Our Top Ten is a measure of how many editors choose to reprint each of our cartoons, from the 62 cartoonists in our CagleCartoons.com syndication package. Just about half of America’s daily, paid circulation newspapers (around 700 papers) subscribe to CagleCartoons.com


Our reader supported site, Cagle.com, still needs you!  Journalism is threatened with the pandemic that has shuttered newspaper advertisers. Some pundits predict that a large percentage of newspapers won’t survive the pandemic economic slump, and as newspapers sink, so do editorial cartoonists who depend on newspapers, and along with them, our Cagle.com site, that our small, sinking syndicate largely supports, along with our fans.

The world needs political cartoonists more now than ever. Please consider supporting Cagle.com and visit Cagle.com/heroes.  We need you! Don’t let the cartoons die!

#1

Jeff Koterba shares a four-way tie for the most reprinted cartoon of the week.

 

#1

Rick McKee also shares the tie for first place.

 

#1

My own “call to vote” cartoon from last Saturday was intended to run on election day, last Tuesday.

 

#1

My cartoon from after Election Day also shares the four-way tie for #1.

 

#5

Our newest CagleCartoonist, Pat Byrnes makes his debut in the Top Ten with this popular cartoon.

 

#6

RJ Matson takes 6th place with this Election Day cartoon.

 

#7

Dave Granlund nabs 7th place with this post-Election Day cartoon.

 

#8

John Darkow takes 8th place.

 

#9

Pat Bagley nabs 9th place with this nice “call to vote” cartoon.

 

#10

Jeff Koterba wraps up the Top Ten with this cartoon.


Please forward this to your friends – tell them our Cagle.com email newsletters are FREE and FUN! They can join the newsletter list at Cagle.com/subscribe.


Don’t miss our most popular cartoons of the week collections:

Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through November 21st, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through November 14th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through November 7th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through October 31st, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through October 24th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through October 17th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through October 10th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through October 3rd, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through September 26th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through September 19th, 2020
T
op Ten Cartoons of the Week through September 12th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through September 5th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through August 29th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through August 22nd, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through August 15th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through August 8th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through August 1st, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through July 25th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through July 18th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through July 11th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through July 4th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through June 20th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through June 13th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through June 6th, 2020

Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through May 30th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through May 23rd, 2020

Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through May 16th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through May 8th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Pandemic (as of May 4th)
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through May 2nd, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through 4/26/20, (all coronavirus)

Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through 4/18/20, (all coronavirus)
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week, through 4/11/20 (all coronavirus)
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week, 4/4/20 (all coronavirus)
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week, 3/29/20 (all coronavirus)
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week, 3/21/20 (all coronavirus)

Categories
Blog Newsletter Syndicate Top 10

Top Ten Cartoons of the Week – October 31, 2020

Here are our most reprinted cartoons of last week (October 24th, through October 31st, 2020). Newspaper editors flocked to the same, few cartoons and most of the cartoons got little or no exposure. Cartoons mentioning Trump or Biden were unpopular with editors again this week.

Editors’ collective preference for a handful of cartoons was never clearer to see as the #1 and #2 cartoons this week were also the #1 and #2 cartoons of the year, since we started keeping comparative usage statistics last January. Congratulations to Dave Granlund for his runaway #1 cartoon and to Dave Whamond for his #2 of the week and year.

Special congratulations to John Darkow who has two cartoons in the Top Ten this week, and kudos to the other cartoonists with the most reprinted cartoons: Gary McCoy, Jeff Koterba, Chris Weyant, Pat Bagley, Bob Englehart and Dave Fitzsimmons.

Our Top Ten is a measure of how many editors choose to reprint each of our cartoons, from the 62 cartoonists in our CagleCartoons.com syndication package. Just about half of America’s daily, paid circulation newspapers (around 700 papers) subscribe to CagleCartoons.com


Our reader supported site, Cagle.com, still needs you!  Journalism is threatened with the pandemic that has shuttered newspaper advertisers. Some pundits predict that a large percentage of newspapers won’t survive the pandemic economic slump, and as newspapers sink, so do editorial cartoonists who depend on newspapers, and along with them, our Cagle.com site, that our small, sinking syndicate largely supports, along with our fans.

The world needs political cartoonists more now than ever. Please consider supporting Cagle.com and visit Cagle.com/heroes.  We need you! Don’t let the cartoons die!

#1

Dave Granlund’s #1 cartoon was a runaway hit with newspaper editors and our most reprinted cartoon of the year.

 

#2

Dave Whamond drew the #2 most popular cartoon of both the week and the year.

 

#3

Gary McCoy takes 3rd place with the first of four Halloween cartoons in the Top Ten.

 

#4

Jeff Koterba claims 4th place.

 

#5

John Darkow takes the five spot with the first of two cartoons in the Top Ten.

 

#6

John Darkow also takes 6th place with his second of two cartoons in the Top Ten.

 

#7

Chris Weyant nabs 7th place.

 

#8

Pat Bagley is tied for 8th place.

 

#8

Bob Englehart shares 8th place.

 

#10

Dave Fitzsimmons caps off the Top Ten with this cartoon.


Please forward this to your friends – tell them our Cagle.com email newsletters are FREE and FUN! They can join the newsletter list at Cagle.com/subscribe.


Don’t miss our most popular cartoons of the week collections:

Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through November 21st, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through November 14th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through November 7th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through October 31st, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through October 24th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through October 17th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through October 10th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through October 3rd, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through September 26th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through September 19th, 2020
T
op Ten Cartoons of the Week through September 12th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through September 5th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through August 29th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through August 22nd, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through August 15th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through August 8th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through August 1st, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through July 25th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through July 18th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through July 11th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through July 4th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through June 20th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through June 13th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through June 6th, 2020

Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through May 30th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through May 23rd, 2020

Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through May 16th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through May 8th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Pandemic (as of May 4th)
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through May 2nd, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through 4/26/20, (all coronavirus)

Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through 4/18/20, (all coronavirus)
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week, through 4/11/20 (all coronavirus)
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week, 4/4/20 (all coronavirus)
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week, 3/29/20 (all coronavirus)
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week, 3/21/20 (all coronavirus)

Categories
Blog Newsletter Syndicate Top 10

Top Ten Cartoons of the Week – October 24, 2020

Here are our most reprinted cartoons of last week (October 17th, through October 24th, 2020). As usual, drawings of President Trump were not popular with newspaper editors, but a tiny Trump sneaked into the Top Ten in John Cole‘s #4 debate cartoon.  Again this week the Top Ten cartoons dominated newspaper reprints as less popular cartoons got little or no ink and editors flocked to the same cartoons.

Dave Whamond had a fantastic week with three cartoons in the Top Ten – Dave’s #1 cartoon was a hit that ranks in the top five of the year.  John Cole also had an impressive week with two cartoons in the Top Ten.

Congratulations to the other CagleCartoonists with Top Ten cartoons this week: Gary McCoy,  John Darkow,  Jeff Koterba, Randy Enos and Chris Weyant.

Our Top Ten is a measure of how many editors choose to reprint each of our cartoons, from the 62 cartoonists in our CagleCartoons.com syndication package. Just about half of America’s daily, paid circulation newspapers (around 700 papers) subscribe to CagleCartoons.com


Our reader supported site, Cagle.com, still needs you!  Journalism is threatened with the pandemic that has shuttered newspaper advertisers. Some pundits predict that a large percentage of newspapers won’t survive the pandemic economic slump, and as newspapers sink, so do editorial cartoonists who depend on newspapers, and along with them, our Cagle.com site, that our small, sinking syndicate largely supports, along with our fans.

The world needs political cartoonists more now than ever. Please consider supporting Cagle.com and visit Cagle.com/heroes.  We need you! Don’t let the cartoons die!

#1

Dave Whamond had a #1 cartoon that was a runaway hit with editors; it is Dave’s first of three cartoons in the Top Ten.

#2

Gary McCoy takes second place.

 

#3

John Darkow takes 3rd place.

#4

John Cole shares 4th place with his first of two cartoons in the Top Ten.

 

#4

Dave Whamond is tied for 4th place with his second of three cartoons in the Top Ten.

 

 

#6

John Cole takes 6th place with his second cartoon in the Top Ten.  Only four cartoons in the Top Ten are about the pandemic this week

 

#7

Jeff Koterba takes 7th place.

 

#8

Dave Whamond caps off his impressive week with his third cartoon in the Top Ten.

 

 

#9

Randy Enos shares 9th place.

 

#9

Chris Weyant caps off the Top Ten with this cartoon, tied for 9th place.


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Don’t miss our most popular cartoons of the week collections:

Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through November 21st, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through November 14th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through November 7th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through October 31st, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through October 24th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through October 17th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through October 10th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through October 3rd, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through September 26th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through September 19th, 2020
T
op Ten Cartoons of the Week through September 12th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through September 5th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through August 29th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through August 22nd, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through August 15th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through August 8th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through August 1st, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through July 25th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through July 18th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through July 11th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through July 4th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through June 20th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through June 13th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through June 6th, 2020

Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through May 30th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through May 23rd, 2020

Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through May 16th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through May 8th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Pandemic (as of May 4th)
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through May 2nd, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through 4/26/20, (all coronavirus)

Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through 4/18/20, (all coronavirus)
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week, through 4/11/20 (all coronavirus)
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week, 4/4/20 (all coronavirus)
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week, 3/29/20 (all coronavirus)
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week, 3/21/20 (all coronavirus)

Categories
Blog Newsletter Syndicate Top 10

Top Ten Cartoons of the Week – October 17, 2020

Here are our most reprinted cartoons of last week (October 10th, through October 17th, 2020). As usual, no drawings of President Trump were popular with newspaper editors.  Typically 20% of the cartoons get 80% of the reprints; this week it is more like 10% of the cartoons getting 90% of the reprints as less popular cartoons got little or no ink and editors flocked to the same cartoons.

My own cartoon from last Sunday was #1 this week, by a big margin; in fact, it is the most reprinted cartoon since we starting keeping comparative download stats from subscribing newspaper editors at the beginning of the year.

Dave Whamond also stood well above the crowd with a #2 cartoon that would have been a strong #1 in any other week. Dave and I both had two cartoons on the Top Ten this week. Congratulations to the other cartoonists who made the unusually hot Top Ten this week, Dave Fitzsimmons, Steve Sack, Dave Granlund, Rick McKee, Kevin Siers and RJ Matson.

Our Top Ten is a measure of how many editors choose to reprint each of our cartoons, from the 62 cartoonists in our CagleCartoons.com syndication package. Just about half of America’s daily, paid circulation newspapers (around 700 papers) subscribe to CagleCartoons.com


Our reader supported site, Cagle.com, still needs you!  Journalism is threatened with the pandemic that has shuttered newspaper advertisers. Some pundits predict that a large percentage of newspapers won’t survive the pandemic economic slump, and as newspapers sink, so do editorial cartoonists who depend on newspapers, and along with them, our Cagle.com site, that our small, sinking syndicate largely supports, along with our fans.

The world needs political cartoonists more now than ever. Please consider supporting Cagle.com and visit Cagle.com/heroes.  We need you! Don’t let the cartoons die!

#1

My own cartoon nabbed first place this week (and this year, so far), outpacing the pack by a big margin.  See the Daryl Cagle archive.

#2

Dave Whamond had a #2 cartoon that was unusually popular with editors; it is Dave’s first of two cartoons in the Top Ten.

 

#3

Dave Fitzsimmons takes 3rd place. It looks like “Halloween in these crazy times” is what editors want.

#4

Dave Whamond takes 4th place with his second of two cartoons in the Top Ten.

 

#5

RJ Matson nabs 5th place as Republicans get closer to killing Obamacare.

 

#6

My own “Halloween in these crazy times” cartoon is tied for 6th place.  See the Daryl Cagle archive.

 

#6

Rick McKee shares 6th place with his “Halloween in these crazy times” cartoon.

 

#8

Dave Granlund takes 8th place with another “Halloween in these crazy times” cartoon.

 

#9

Steve Sack takes 9th place.

 

#10

And Kevin Siers takes the ten spot with a COVID “these crazy times” cartoon.


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Don’t miss our most popular cartoons of the week collections:

Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through November 21st, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through November 14th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through November 7th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through October 31st, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through October 24th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through October 17th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through October 10th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through October 3rd, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through September 26th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through September 19th, 2020
T
op Ten Cartoons of the Week through September 12th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through September 5th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through August 29th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through August 22nd, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through August 15th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through August 8th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through August 1st, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through July 25th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through July 18th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through July 11th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through July 4th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through June 20th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through June 13th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through June 6th, 2020

Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through May 30th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through May 23rd, 2020

Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through May 16th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through May 8th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Pandemic (as of May 4th)
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through May 2nd, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through 4/26/20, (all coronavirus)

Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through 4/18/20, (all coronavirus)
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week, through 4/11/20 (all coronavirus)
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week, 4/4/20 (all coronavirus)
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week, 3/29/20 (all coronavirus)
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week, 3/21/20 (all coronavirus)

Categories
Blog Newsletter Syndicate Top 10

Top Ten Cartoons of the Week – October 10, 2020

Here are our most reprinted cartoons of last week (October 3rd, through October 10th, 2020). As usual, no drawings of President Trump were popular with editors, even with Trump dominating the news every day.

My own cartoon was #1 this week, by an unusually wide margin. Dave Whamond had a whopper of a week with three cartoons in the Top Ten. Steve Sack and Dave Granlund also had impressive weeks, each taking two spots on the Top Ten.

Congratulations to the other two cartoonists with Top Ten cartoons: Jeff Koterba and Rick McKee.

Our Top Ten is a measure of how many editors choose to reprint each of our cartoons, from the 62 cartoonists in our CagleCartoons.com syndication package. Just about half of America’s daily, paid circulation newspapers (around 700 papers) subscribe to CagleCartoons.com. 20% of the cartoons get 80% of the reprints, and the Top Ten cartoons are what most readers see inter newspapers.


Our reader supported site, Cagle.com, still needs you!  Journalism is threatened with the pandemic that has shuttered newspaper advertisers. Some pundits predict that a large percentage of newspapers won’t survive the pandemic economic slump, and as newspapers sink, so do editorial cartoonists who depend on newspapers, and along with them, our Cagle.com site, that our small, sinking syndicate largely supports, along with our fans.

The world needs political cartoonists more now than ever. Please consider supporting Cagle.com and visit Cagle.com/heroes.  We need you! Don’t let the cartoons die!

#1

My own cartoon nabbed first place, outpacing the pack by a big margin.  See the Daryl Cagle archive.

#2

Steve Sack follows with his first of two cartoons in the Top Ten.

 

#3

Jeff Koterba takes 3rd place. Readers love memorial cartoons.

#4

Dave Granlund had a strong week, here’s Dave’s first of two cartoons in the Top Ten.

 

#5

Dave Whamond takes 5th place with his first of three cartoons in the Top Ten.

 

#6

Dave Granlund is tied for 6th place with his second Top Ten cartoon.

 

#6

Steve Sack shares 6th place with his second cartoon in the Top Ten.

 

#8

Rick McKee is tied for 8th place.

 

#8

Dave Whamond shares 8th place with his second of three cartoons in the Top Ten.

 

#10

And Dave Whamond wraps up the week with his third cartoon on the list.


Please forward this to your friends – tell them our Cagle.com email newsletters are FREE and FUN! They can join the newsletter list at Cagle.com/subscribe.


Don’t miss our most popular cartoons of the week collections:
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through October 17th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through October 10th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through October 3rd, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through September 26th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through September 19th, 2020
T
op Ten Cartoons of the Week through September 12th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through September 5th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through August 29th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through August 22nd, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through August 15th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through August 8th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through August 1st, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through July 25th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through July 18th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through July 11th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through July 4th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through June 20th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through June 13th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through June 6th, 2020

Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through May 30th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through May 23rd, 2020

Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through May 16th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through May 8th, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Pandemic (as of May 4th)
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through May 2nd, 2020
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through 4/26/20, (all coronavirus)

Top Ten Cartoons of the Week through 4/18/20, (all coronavirus)
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week, through 4/11/20 (all coronavirus)
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week, 4/4/20 (all coronavirus)
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week, 3/29/20 (all coronavirus)
Top Ten Cartoons of the Week, 3/21/20 (all coronavirus)

 

 

Categories
Blog Newsletter Syndicate

Statistics: The Cartoons that Newspaper Editors Like … and Don’t Like

Newspaper editorial cartoonists love to draw president Trump! We make Trump fat. We give Trump a crazy, long, red tie, a bright, orange face and a grand swoop of yellow hair. Trump appears in editorial cartoons more than any other president, or anything else, has ever appeared in cartoons before. Just as Trump dominates the news on TV every night, he dominates political cartoons. Our problem is that newspaper editors don’t like publishing drawings of Trump.

I’m a cartoonist who runs a newspaper “syndicate” that distributes the work of about sixty of the top cartoonists from around the world to newspaper editorial page editors. Close to half of America’s approximately 1,400 daily, paid-circulation newspapers subscribe to my “package” service at CagleCartoons.com, where editors can pick what they like from a collection of up to twenty different cartoons on a single day. We have a broad range of political cartoons, reflecting a spectrum of content from liberal to conservative, across a range of issues, and editors are free to choose from any of it, with each cartoon presented in the same way. Subscribing editors choose to download high-resolution images of the latest cartoons to print in their papers, and I track the statistics of what the editors choose to download.

Since our our subscribing editors represent a very large and fairly random sampling of newspapers, I can safely project that the trends we see in editors’ choices are representative of all American newspapers, including those that subscribe to our competitors who offer a similar range of editorial cartoons in their syndicate packages. I don’t think anyone has ever tracked statistics like this before, and what the stats reveal about editors is surprising.

The most surprising thing the statistics reveal is that editors simply don’t want political cartoons that depict Trump. Sometimes, when Trump makes lots of news, the majority of the editorial cartoonists draw the president and editors still avoid the Trump cartoons.

The last cartoon depicting president Trump, that made our Top Ten cartoons of the week, was this one I drew of Trump and a looming COVID 19 wave, back in March.

I post a collection of the Top Ten most reprinted cartoons of the week, every week on my blog at DarylCagle.com. 20% of our cartoons get 80% of the reprints, and the Top Ten cartoons are by far the most reprinted. The last time a drawing of Trump made our Top Ten list was in March; it was a drawing I did of a tiny Trump who is oblivious to a giant wave of coronavirus that was about to hit him.

Most newspapers are small, rural or suburban newspapers in conservative areas; big city papers tend to be the liberal ones. Most cartoonists are liberal, and the conventional wisdom among cartoonists has been that conservative cartoonists are more widely reprinted because there are few conservative cartoonists and most, small and red state papers want conservative cartoons; recent stats show that this is all wrong. Even though we hear from conservative editors who complain that there aren’t enough conservative cartoons, editors from both liberal and conservative regions tend to select the same cartoons – funny cartoons about newsy topics that express little or no opinion. In fact, the more strongly an opinion is expressed in a cartoon, either liberal or conservative, the less likely editors are to choose to reprint the cartoon.


The world needs political cartoonists more now than ever. Please consider supporting Cagle.com and visit Cagle.com/heroes.  We need you! Don’t let the cartoons die!


Editorial cartoonists have their own, macho culture. We like to draw strong cartoons that hit readers over the head with our point of view. We draw out of passion. We’re certainly not in the business for the money, so the choices editors make are very frustrating for us. Some strong metaphors can almost guarantee that a cartoon won’t be reprinted, no matter what the point the metaphor is used to make. Cartoonists, especially foreign cartoonists, like to draw blood in cartoons to represent terrible violence, they like images of the Ku Klux Klan to represent racism, and drawings of Hitler to depict a murdering, fascist tyrant; these cartoons rarely get reprinted.

American editors don’t like cartoons from foreign countries at all; conversely, foreign editors don’t like reprinting American cartoonists. The idea that cartoons are a “universal language” is a canard; editorial cartoons stop at national borders. Unless there is a huge foreign story involving America overseas, American editors don’t choose to reprint cartoons about foreign events even by American cartoonists.

New events find their way onto the Top Ten. We’ve had some cartoons on the Black Lives Matter protests and racist monuments show up on our Top Ten recently, but not as many as I’d like to see. There were many more images of Trump in cartoons that got ink in the early days of the administration.

What do editors like? Lately they like cartoons about the pandemic, with cartoons about families coping with shortages, masks, back to school, social distancing and sports topping the list. In normal times, editors prefer cartoons that comment on popular culture, celebrity schadenfreude, modern family dynamics, struggles with technology, the workplace and new trends.

The timid choices that newspaper editors make are disturbing enough to bring a tear to the eye of the Statue of Liberty.

This “back to school” cartoon I drew made #1 on our Top Ten list one week. This is typical of the type of cartoons editors prefer now.

Please forward this to your friends – tell them our Cagle.com email newsletters are FREE and FUN! They can join the newsletter list at Cagle.com/subscribe.


Don’t miss our most popular cartoons of the week collections:
The Most Popular Cartoons of the Week through August 1st, 2020
The Most Popular Cartoons of the Week through July 25th, 2020
The Most Popular Cartoons of the Week through July 18th, 2020
The Most Popular Cartoons of the Week through July 11th, 2020
The Most Popular Cartoons of the Week through July 4th, 2020
The Most Popular Cartoons of the Week through June 20th, 2020
The Most Popular Cartoons of the Week through June 13th, 2020
The Most Popular Cartoons of the Week through June 6th, 2020

The Most Popular Cartoons of the Week through May 30th, 2020
The Most Popular Cartoons of the Week through May 23rd, 2020

The Most Popular Cartoons of the Week through May 16th, 2020
The Most Popular Cartoons of the Week through May 8th, 2020
The Most Popular Cartoons of the Pandemic (as of May 4th)
The Most Popular Cartoons of the Week through May 2nd, 2020
The Most popular Cartoons of the Week through 4/26/20, (all coronavirus)

The Most popular Cartoons of the Week through 4/18/20, (all coronavirus)
The Most popular Cartoons of the Week, through 4/11/20 (all coronavirus)
The Most Popular Cartoons of the Week, 4/4/20 (all coronavirus)
The Most Popular Cartoons of the Week, 3/29/20 (all coronavirus)
The Most Popular Cartoons of the Week, 3/21/20 (all coronavirus)

 

 

Categories
Blog Newsletter Syndicate

Cartoon Complaint Campaigns

Tempers run short in turbulent times, so it is no surprise that provocative editorial cartoons sometimes get blowback from readers. Cartoons generate angry conversation on social media, but they seldom generate complaints to us, or to the newspapers that run them – unless there is an organized campaign to solicit complaints. These campaigns usually take the form of Facebook pages that demand that an editor or cartoonist is punished, or simply demands an apology, and newspapers are often quick to apologize.

Sometimes editors blame their choices on poor editorial cartoons in general, as when the New York Times dumped the little Cartoonists & Writers Syndicate that they hosted and announced that they would stop running editorial cartoons entirely in all of their editions. One of our CagleCartoonists, Patrick Chappatte, lost his regular gig for the International New York Times with this editorial overreaction, over a cartoon that Patrick didn’t draw.

Back in July of 2016, a complaint campaign against the St Louis Post-Dispatch targeted this Dave Granlund “itchy trigger-finger” cartoon and elicited a typical apology from the editor.

This week there was a similar campaign of complaints and demands about the “Bad Cops Under the Bed” cartoon of mine that ran in the St Louis Post-Dispatch, but this time the newspaper, to their credit, didn’t apologize and stood behind me and the cartoon in an editorial.

The offending Antonio Antunes cartoon that lost a job for CagleCartoonist Patrick Chappatte, crushed a little syndicate and lost a top venue for all editorial cartooning as the New York Times banned cartoons.

Earlier this month there was yet another complaint campaign about a Gary McCoy cartoon in the Florence SC Morning News. This longtime CagleCartoons subscribing paper prints just about every cartoon that opposes abortion rights and there aren’t a whole lot of those, so when one pops up it is no surprise that it gets ink in Florence. The abortion topic doesn’t mix well with Black Lives Matter (I thought the cartoon was offensive myself) and the paper apologized, going the New York Times route of announcing that they are no longer running any editorial cartoons at all. They still like our columnist Michael Reagan though, so they continue to be a good subscriber and we hope to woo them back with more, great conservative cartoons. (Those anti-abortion cartoons are pretty hard to resist in Florence.)

Also earlier this month, our CagleCartoonist Rick McKee suffered a complaint campaign with this cartoon in The Columbian newspaper in Washington. The newspaper took the usual route of apologizing for the cartoon, but didn’t ban all cartoons.

There are more recent examples with cartoons from cartoonists who aren’t represented by my little syndicate generating complaints campaigns and newspaper apologies, but I’m not posting them here because, well, they aren’t represented by my little syndicate.

This is the new normal:

1. A reader is offended by a cartoon she disagrees with in her local newspaper and puts up a Facebook campaign soliciting complaints demanding an apology, the firing of the editor and/or the firing of the cartoonist.

2. The Newspaper apologizes for their poor choice of cartoon; or they stop running all cartoons. No other newspapers get complaints about the cartoon, only the one paper that has a campaigning reader gets complaints.

3. Repeat.

It was nice to see the St Louis Post-Dispatch break that pattern this week, standing by my cartoon. Editors should have the guts to stand behind their decisions.